The Journal of the IYNA

The IYNA Journal is written, edited, and published by our members. IYNA clubs or individual members are encouraged to contribute articles to the journal. Each edition of the journal has a recommended theme with previous themes including neurodegenerative disorders, sleep, learning and memory, drug addiction, and auditory and vestibular systems. Issues of the IYNA Journal typically are divided into the following sections: General Neuroscience, Diseases, Research, New Technology, Neuroscience and Society, Neuroethics, and Satire. Each journal section is overseen by a head writer. The journal is edited by a team of junior editors, senior editors, and an Editor-in-Chief. If you are interested in writing for the IYNA journal, you can find more information at www.youthneuro.org/journal/submit.php.

A Cellular View of the Brain

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Basics of Neuroscience I: A Cellular View of the Brain Alexander Skvortsov, Jacob Umans, and William Ellsworth   Introduction Hello, reader, and welcome to the IYNA’s Basics of Neuroscience Course. This course will help provide a basic understanding of how the brain and nervous system works.  Throughout our issues, we will explain every facet of neuroscience, […]

An Introduction to Internal Neural Communication

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Basics of Neuroscience II: An Introduction to Internal Neural Communication Alexander Skvortsov, William Ellsworth and Jacob Umans   Hello readers of IYNA Journal, and welcome back to the Basics of Neuroscience course, presented by the IYNA. In last week’s lesson, we discussed the basic structure of neurons. We also touched upon basic neural communication, discussing synapses […]

Neuronal Communication

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  Basics of Neuroscience III: Neuronal Communication Alexander Skvortsov, Jacob Umans, William Ellsworth   Hello IYNA readers, and welcome to our third Basics of Neuroscience lesson. Today, we will explain how neurons communicate with each other. Last month, we explained how each neuron acts as an independent relay stations. In this issue, we hope to discuss […]

The Necessity of Sleep

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The Necessity of Sleep Alexander Skvortsov   Introduction The average human adult sleeps for 8 hours a night. This amounts to one third of your lifetime. Now at first glance, one might wonder: why must we spend so much time doing nothing? While it seems as if sleep is just a waste of time, a […]

A Short Overview of What Happens When We Sleep

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An Overview of What Happens When We Sleep  Kyle Ryan   Sleep is vital to the human body, but can often seem like a pain or a nuisance to any six-year-old. Scientists have long thought of sleep as a mystery, not understanding why we spent 1/3 of our lives on our pillows. Nevertheless, ancient scientists understood […]

LTP and learning

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Basics of Neuroscience IV: Learning and Memory Alexander Skvortsov, Jacob Umans, William Ellsworth, Maggie Xia   Hello IYNA readers, and welcome to our fourth Basics of Neuroscience lesson. Today, we will explain how neuronal bonds grow and decrease in strength to form memories and allow us to learn. Last month, we explained the molecular and chemical […]

Basics of Neuroscience: Addiction

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Basics of Neuroscience V: Addiction Alexander Skvortsov   Introduction In society, drug abuse and addiction is often perceived as solely the result of poor life choices.  As a consequence of this view, addicts– who are certainly suffering enough already– are stigmatized by society. Such a perspective flies in the face of neuroscience.  A plethora of […]

An Introduction to Neuroanatomy

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Basics of Neuroscience VI: An Introduction to Neuroanatomy Alexander Skvortsov   Introduction Like most complex organ systems, the nervous system is composed of many parts. One can consider the brain on the scale of hemispheres, regions, neural circuits, individual neurons, or even on molecules. In previous editions of Basics of Neuroscience, we have considered the cellular composition […]

The Role of The Right Hemisphere in Language

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The Role of The Right Hemisphere in Language Lorrayne Isidoro Gonçalves   Introduction Before the breakthroughs of Broca and Wernicke, the notion of language regions was based on observations in patients with brain injuries. This was not able to directly determine the brain areas in which language is localized. This researchers studied their patients and […]